The land area of Kenai Peninsula Borough, AK was 16,075 in 2018.

Land Area

Water Area

Land area is a measurement providing the size, in square miles, of the land portions of geographic entities for which the Census Bureau tabulates and disseminates data. Area is calculated from the specific boundary recorded for each entity in the Census Bureau's geographic database. Land area is based on current information in the TIGER® data base, calculated for use with Census 2010.

Water Area figures include inland, coastal, Great Lakes, and territorial sea water. Inland water consists of any lake, reservoir, pond, or similar body of water that is recorded in the Census Bureau's geographic database. It also includes any river, creek, canal, stream, or similar feature that is recorded in that database as a two- dimensional feature (rather than as a single line). The portions of the oceans and related large embayments (such as Chesapeake Bay and Puget Sound), the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea that belong to the United States and its territories are classified as coastal and territorial waters; the Great Lakes are treated as a separate water entity. Rivers and bays that empty into these bodies of water are treated as inland water from the point beyond which they are narrower than 1 nautical mile across. Identification of land and inland, coastal, territorial, and Great Lakes waters is for data presentation purposes only and does not necessarily reflect their legal definitions.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Geographic and Area Datasets Involving Kenai Peninsula Borough, AK

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Autonomous underwater vehicle for tracking acoustically-tagged fish 2010

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:37:47.000Z

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are increasingly being used to collect physical, chemical, and biological information in the marine environment. Recent efforts have been made to merge AUV technology with acoustic telemetry to provide information on the distribution and movements of marine fish. During 2010, we conducted a study in coastal waters near Juneau, Alaska to determine the feasibility of using AUVs to locate marine species under rigorous field conditions, and to compare this approach with traditional vessel-based tracking. Tracking surveys were conducted with a REMUS 100 AUV equipped with an integrated acoustic receiver and hydrophone. The AUV was programmed to navigate along predetermined routes to detect acoustic transmitters within the area. Comparable surveys were conducted with a boat equipped with acoustic tracking gear. Moorings with transmitters at 20-500 m were deployed to provide acoustic targets at known locations and depths. Marine fishes and crabs were tagged to provide mobile targets. Transmitter depth had a major impact on tracking performance. The AUV was equally effective or better detecting reference transmitters in shallow water, and significantly better than the boat for transmitters at deeper depths. Similar results were observed for the tagged animals. Crabs at moderate depths were recorded by both tracking methods, while only the AUV detected fish at depths exceeding 500 m. The AUV periodically had difficulty navigating and maintaining course due to the strong currents and extreme depths in the area. AUVs with greater cruising speeds, increased operating depths, and improved navigation would enhance AUV performance in marine environments.

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Marine Debris Surveys in Alaska, 1972-2015

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T05:03:14.000Z

    Scientists at the Auke Bay Laboratory have conducted marine debris surveys on select beaches in Alaska periodically since 1972. Some of the beaches previously sampled have been identified as marine debris hot spots due to their increased debris accumulation. At each location, multiple 1 km beach segments were sampled by people walking the beach and enumerating all anthropogenic marine debris found. The beach area surveyed was from the waters edge up to the base of the storm berm or log piles. Individual beach segments have been walked multiple times in the since 1972 allowing for a direct comparison with prior years. Sampling occurred in late spring and summer to test the hypothesis of change in marine debris sources due to increased summer boat traffic and the diminished occurrence and severity of storms.

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Blackspotted and rougheye rockfish genetics and age data from RACE trawl surveys

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:58:21.000Z

    This data set contains field and genetic identification of rougheye (Sebastes aleutianus) and blackspotted (Sebastes melanostictus) rockfish collected during AFSC bottom trawl surveys. There is considerable difficulty in correctly distinquishing between these species of rockfish in the field. The database contains the field identification of each specimen, genetic identification (true species identification) along with biological information for each specimen including weight, length, and age. Also included is the location and water depth where each specimen was collected.

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Sockeye salmon allozyme baseline - 1982-1990

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:57:07.000Z

    Genetic data were collected and prepared with the use of protein electrophoresis from 52 spawning locations in southeastern Alaska and northern British Columbia. Genetic relationships were examined from principal components analysis and unrooted trees constructed from genetic distances between collections. These descriptive analyses suggest a geographic basis to genetic divergence among populations. This geographic basis was confirmed using log-likelihood-ratio analysis and analyses of variance. Three groups of populations were observed: one from systems that drain into the inside waters of northern and central southeast Alaska; another from the far southeastern islands (including Prince of Wales Island); and the third in systems of the southern inside waters. Although the geographic structure was a statistically significant component of the overall genetic structure, gene diversity analysis indicates that only about 4.7% of the total genetic variability was attributable to genetic differences among those regions, whereas about 8.4% of the total was due to differences among populations within each region. The other 87.0% of the variation occurred, on average, within each collection.

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Marine Debris Surveys in Alaska, 1972-2015

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T05:02:28.000Z

    Scientists at the Auke Bay Laboratory have conducted marine debris surveys on select beaches in Alaska periodically since 1972. Some of the beaches previously sampled have been identified as marine debris hot spots due to their increased debris accumulation. At each location, multiple 1 km beach segments were sampled by people walking the beach and enumerating all anthropogenic marine debris found. The beach area surveyed was from the waters edge up to the base of the storm berm or log piles. Individual beach segments have been walked multiple times in the since 1972 allowing for a direct comparison with prior years. Sampling occurred in late spring and summer to test the hypothesis of change in marine debris sources due to increased summer boat traffic and the diminished occurrence and severity of storms.

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Marine Debris Surveys in Alaska, 1972-2015

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-21T22:02:53.000Z

    Scientists at the Auke Bay Laboratory have conducted marine debris surveys on select beaches in Alaska periodically since 1972. Some of the beaches previously sampled have been identified as marine debris hot spots due to their increased debris accumulation. At each location, multiple 1 km beach segments were sampled by people walking the beach and enumerating all anthropogenic marine debris found. The beach area surveyed was from the waters edge up to the base of the storm berm or log piles. Individual beach segments have been walked multiple times in the since 1972 allowing for a direct comparison with prior years. Sampling occurred in late spring and summer to test the hypothesis of change in marine debris sources due to increased summer boat traffic and the diminished occurrence and severity of storms.

  • API

    AFSC/RACE/SAP/Swiney: Effects of ocean acidification and increased temperatures on juvenile red king crab

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:49:45.000Z

    Multiple stressor studies are needed to better understand the effects of oceanic changes on marine organisms. To determine the effects of near-future ocean acidification and warming temperature on juvenile red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) survival, growth, and morphology, we conducted a long-term (184 d) fully crossed experiment with two pHs and three temperatures: ambient pH (~7.99), pH 7.8, ambient temperature, ambient +2 degree C, and ambient +4 degree C, for a total of 6 treatments.

  • API

    AFSC/RACE/SAP/Swiney: Effects of ocean acidification and increased temperatures on juvenile red king crab

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2017-09-19T04:50:14.000Z

    Multiple stressor studies are needed to better understand the effects of oceanic changes on marine organisms. To determine the effects of near-future ocean acidification and warming temperature on juvenile red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) survival, growth, and morphology, we conducted a long-term (184 d) fully crossed experiment with two pHs and three temperatures: ambient pH (~7.99), pH 7.8, ambient temperature, ambient +2 degree C, and ambient +4 degree C, for a total of 6 treatments.

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Eastern Bering Sea (BASIS) Coastal Research on Juvenile Salmon (Oceanography and Zooplankton data)

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2019-02-21T22:17:18.000Z

    Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) runs in rivers that flow into the eastern Bering Sea have been inconsistent and at times very weak. Low returns of chinook (O. tshawytscha) and chum (O. keta) salmon to the Yukon River, Kuskokwim River, and Norton Sound areas of Alaska prompted the state of Alaska to restrict commercial and subsistence fisheries during 2000 and declare the region a fisheries disaster area. Weak salmon returns to these river systems follow several years of low sockeye (O. nerka) salmon returns to Bristol Bay, which was declared a fisheries disaster region during 1998 by both the State of Alaska and the U.S. Department of Commerce. Causes of the poor salmon returns to these river systems are not known however, the regional-scale decline of these stocks indicates that the marine environment may play a critical role. Ocean conditions, particularly in the first few months after the salmon leave fresh water, are known to significantly affect salmon survival (Holtby et al. 1990; Friedland et al. 1996; Beamish and Mahnken 2001). Mechanisms affecting marine survival of the eastern Bering Sea salmon stocks are unknown, principally due to the lack of marine life history information on western Alaska salmon. To improve understanding of the marine life-history stage of salmon in the Bering Sea, the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission (NPAFC) began an internationally coordinated research program on salmon in the Bering Sea called the Bering-Aleutian Salmon International Survey (BASIS) (NPAFC 2001). As part of BASIS, scientists from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Ocean Carrying Capacity (OCC) program conducted a fall survey on the eastern Bering Sea shelf to provide key ecological data for eastern Bering Sea salmon stocks during their juvenile life-history stage. The goal of the OCC/BASIS salmon research cruise was to understand mechanisms underlying the effects of environment on distribution, migration, and growth of juvenile salmon on the eastern Bering Sea shelf. Primary objectives of BASIS include: 1) to determine the extent of offshore migrations of juvenile salmon from rivers draining into the eastern Bering Sea, 2) to describe the physical environment of the eastern and northeastern Bering Sea shelf occupied by juvenile salmon, and 3) to collect biological information on other ecologically important species. Summaries of previous Bering Sea juvenile salmon research cruises can be found in Farley et al. (1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005).

  • API

    AFSC/ABL: Nearshore Fish Atlas of Alaska

    noaa-fisheries-afsc.data.socrata.com | Last Updated 2019-02-21T22:21:50.000Z

    Information on the distribution and relative abundance of nearshore fishes from beach seine hauls in Alaska is now available to managers as an online Fish Atlas. The atlas is dynamic and will continually be updated as more data becomes available. Presently, the atlas includes distribution and habitat use information for nearshore fishes in southeastern Alaska, Prince William Sound, the Aleutian Islands, and the Arctic. This online database has been designed to integrate with the spatially explicit, Alaska ShoreZone web enabled GIS platform. Further details about the database design can be found on Auke Bay Laboratories public website.