The land area of New Hampshire was 8,953 in 2018.

Land Area

Water Area

Land area is a measurement providing the size, in square miles, of the land portions of geographic entities for which the Census Bureau tabulates and disseminates data. Area is calculated from the specific boundary recorded for each entity in the Census Bureau's geographic database. Land area is based on current information in the TIGER® data base, calculated for use with Census 2010.

Water Area figures include inland, coastal, Great Lakes, and territorial sea water. Inland water consists of any lake, reservoir, pond, or similar body of water that is recorded in the Census Bureau's geographic database. It also includes any river, creek, canal, stream, or similar feature that is recorded in that database as a two- dimensional feature (rather than as a single line). The portions of the oceans and related large embayments (such as Chesapeake Bay and Puget Sound), the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea that belong to the United States and its territories are classified as coastal and territorial waters; the Great Lakes are treated as a separate water entity. Rivers and bays that empty into these bodies of water are treated as inland water from the point beyond which they are narrower than 1 nautical mile across. Identification of land and inland, coastal, territorial, and Great Lakes waters is for data presentation purposes only and does not necessarily reflect their legal definitions.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

2. To build your own apps using this data, see the ODN Dataset and API links.

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Geographic and Area Datasets Involving New Hampshire

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    Tourism Nova Scotia Visitation

    data.novascotia.ca | Last Updated 2020-05-05T18:27:27.000Z

    Number of non resident overnight visitors to Nova Scotia. The dataset is broken down by visitor origin and mode of entry to the province. Data is reported monthly.

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    NCHS - Birth Rates for Unmarried Women by Age, Race, and Hispanic Origin: United States

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2020-06-05T17:33:34.000Z

    This dataset includes birth rates for unmarried women by age group, race, and Hispanic origin in the United States since 1970. Methods for collecting information on marital status changed over the reporting period and have been documented in: • Ventura SJ, Bachrach CA. Nonmarital childbearing in the United States, 1940–99. National vital statistics reports; vol 48 no 16. Hyattsville, Maryland: National Center for Health Statistics. 2000. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr48/nvs48_16.pdf. • National Center for Health Statistics. User guide to the 2013 natality public use file. Hyattsville, Maryland: National Center for Health Statistics. 2014. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data_access/VitalStatsOnline.htm. National data on births by Hispanics origin exclude data for Louisiana, New Hampshire, and Oklahoma in 1989; for New Hampshire and Oklahoma in 1990; for New Hampshire in 1991 and 1992. Information on reporting Hispanic origin is detailed in the Technical Appendix for the 1999 public-use natality data file (see (ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/Dataset_Documentation/DVS/natality/Nat1999doc.pdf.) All birth data by race before 1980 are based on race of the child. Starting in 1980, birth data by race are based on race of the mother. SOURCES CDC/NCHS, National Vital Statistics System, birth data (see http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/births.htm); public-use data files (see http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data_access/Vitalstatsonline.htm); and CDC WONDER (see http://wonder.cdc.gov/). REFERENCES 1. Curtin SC, Ventura SJ, Martinez GM. Recent declines in nonmarital childbearing in the United States. NCHS data brief, no 162. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2014. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db162.pdf. 2. Martin JA, Hamilton BE, Osterman MJK, et al. Births: Final data for 2015. National vital statistics reports; vol 66 no 1. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2017. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_01.pdf.

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    Water Consumption In The New York City

    data.cityofnewyork.us | Last Updated 2020-05-22T03:08:44.000Z

    A brief history of water consumption in the New York City Water Supply System (Based on New York City Census population)

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    Energy and Water Data Disclosure for Local Law 84 2013 (Data for Calendar Year 2012)

    data.cityofnewyork.us | Last Updated 2019-02-11T22:22:05.000Z

    On September 25, 2013, New York City released the 2012 energy and water use data for all properties required to annually benchmark under Local Law 84. New York City is the first in the nation to publicly disclose data for large multifamily buildings. Approximately a million New Yorkers can now see how much energy and water their apartment buildings consumed in 2012. The new data set includes more than 9,000 self-reported multifamily properties, effectively more than tripling the size of the first year's list. The data also represents the first year's results of both manual and automatic water benchmarking, with more than 6,800 properties reporting water data.

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    Elevation Benchmarks

    data.cityofchicago.org | Last Updated 2013-02-28T15:29:13.000Z

    The following dataset includes "Active Benchmarks," which are provided to facilitate the identification of City-managed standard benchmarks. Standard benchmarks are for public and private use in establishing a point in space. Note: The benchmarks are referenced to the Chicago City Datum = 0.00, (CCD = 579.88 feet above mean tide New York). The City of Chicago Department of Water Management’s (DWM) Topographic Benchmark is the source of the benchmark information contained in this online database. The information contained in the index card system was compiled by scanning the original cards, then transcribing some of this information to prepare a table and map. Over time, the DWM will contract services to field verify the data and update the index card system and this online database.This dataset was last updated September 2011. Coordinates are estimated. To view map, go to https://data.cityofchicago.org/Buildings/Elevation-Benchmarks-Map/kmt9-pg57 or for PDF map, go to http://cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/water/supp_info/Benchmarks/BMMap.pdf. Please read the Terms of Use: http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/narr/foia/data_disclaimer.html.

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    Energy and Water Data Disclosure for Local Law 84 2014 (Data for Calendar Year 2013)

    data.cityofnewyork.us | Last Updated 2019-02-11T22:22:29.000Z

    In September 2014, New York City released the 2013 energy and water use data for all properties required to annually benchmark under Local Law 84.

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    Austin Water Approved Plant List

    data.austintexas.gov | Last Updated 2019-07-29T17:06:11.000Z

    Austin Water’s approved plant list specifies plants that may receive a new landscape/xeriscape watering schedule variance. A landscape must have xeric (low or very low water use) plants to receive the variance. Austin Water might approve other plants if they will be low or very low water use once established. For a list of stabilization/erosion control plants that qualify for this variance, please refer to The City of Austin’s Standard Specifications Manual Item #604S

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    Energy and Water Data Disclosure for Local Law 84 2015 (Data for Calendar Year 2014)

    data.cityofnewyork.us | Last Updated 2018-09-10T19:26:45.000Z

    In December 2015, New York City released the 2014 energy and water use data for all properties required to annually benchmark under Local Law 84.

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    Public Fishing Rights Parking Areas

    data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2019-06-10T18:02:35.000Z

    The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) maintains a network of Public Fishing Right parking areas along trout streams in New York. This dataset represents the locations and information about those parking areas. Links to PDF maps of the actual Public Fishing Rights along the streams are available as part of the data set.

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    Beach Lab Data

    data.cityofchicago.org | Last Updated 2020-08-13T15:00:26.000Z

    The Chicago Park District collects and analyzes water samples from beaches along Chicago’s Lake Michigan lakefront. The Chicago Park District partners with the University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Public Health Laboratory to analyze water samples using a new DNA testing method called Rapid Testing Method (qPCR analysis) which tests for Enterococci in order to monitor swimming safety. The rapid testing method (qPCR analysis) is a new method that measures levels of pathogenic DNA in beach water. Unlike the culture based test that requires up to 24 hours of processing, the new rapid testing method requires a 4-5 hours for results. The Chicago Park District can use results of the rapid test to notify the public when levels exceed UPEPA recommended levels, which is 1000* CCE. When DNA bacteria levels exceed 1000 CCE, a yellow swim advisory flag is implemented. For more information please refer to the USEPA Recreational Water Quality Criteria (http://water.epa.gov/scitech/swguidance/standards/criteria/health/recreation). Historically, the Chicago Park District used the culture based analysis method and statistical prediction models to monitor beach water quality. The culture based method tests for Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria which is an indicator species for the presence of disease-causing bacteria, viruses, and protozoans that may pose health risks to the public. This method requires 18-24 hours of processing to receive results. The Chicago Park District would use results of the culture based method to notify the public when levels exceed UPEPA recommended levels, which is 235* CFU. When bacteria levels exceed 235 CFU, a yellow swim advisory flag was implemented. This standard is still used at most beaches throughout the Great Lakes region. For more information please refer to the USEPA Recreational Water Quality Criteria. The statistical prediction model forecasted real-time Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria levels present in the water. The Chicago Park District (CPD) in partnership with the US Geological Survey, developed statistical prediction models by using weather data pulled from CPD buoys (https://data.cityofchicago.org/d/qmqz-2xku) and weather stations (https://data.cityofchicago.org/d/k7hf-8y75). The Chicago Park District would use results of the predictive model to notify the public when bacteria levels would exceed 235 CFU. When bacteria levels exceed 235 CFU, a yellow swim advisory flag was implemented. * The unit of measurement for Escherichia coli is Colony Forming Units (CFU) per 100 milliliters of water. (Culture Based Method / Statistical Prediction Model) *The unit of measuring DNA is Enterococci Calibrator Cell Equivalents (CCE) per 100 milliliters of water. (Rapid Testing Analysis)