The population density of Norfolk County, MA was 1,763 in 2018.

Population Density

Population Density is computed by dividing the total population by Land Area Per Square Mile.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

1. ODN datasets and APIs are subject to change and may differ in format from the original source data in order to provide a user-friendly experience on this site.

2. To build your own apps using this data, see the ODN Dataset and API links.

3. If you use this derived data in an app, we ask that you provide a link somewhere in your applications to the Open Data Network with a citation that states: "Data for this application was provided by the Open Data Network" where "Open Data Network" links to http://opendatanetwork.com. Where an application has a region specific module, we ask that you add an additional line that states: "Data about REGIONX was provided by the Open Data Network." where REGIONX is an HREF with a name for a geographical region like "Seattle, WA" and the link points to this page URL, e.g. http://opendatanetwork.com/region/1600000US5363000/Seattle_WA

Geographic and Population Datasets Involving Norfolk County, MA

  • API

    Bronx Zip Population and Density

    bronx.lehman.cuny.edu | Last Updated 2012-10-21T14:06:17.000Z

    2010 Census Data on population, pop density, age and ethnicity per zip code

  • API

    WAOFM - Census - Population and Housing, 2000 and 2010

    data.wa.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-01T17:20:31.000Z

    Population and housing information extracted from decennial census Public Law 94-171 redistricting summary files for Washington state for years 2000 and 2010.

  • API

    Deer Tick Surveillance: Adults (Oct to Dec) excluding Powassan virus: Beginning 2008

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2021-05-21T13:37:39.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing adult deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from October to December, when adult deer ticks are most commonly seen. Adult deer ticks are individually tested for different bacteria and parasites, which includes the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide adult tick infections at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and percentage, of ticks infected with the specified bacteria or parasite can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

  • API

    WAOFM - Census - Population Density by County by Decade, 1900 to 2010

    data.wa.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-01T17:20:22.000Z

    Washington state population density by county by decade 1900 to 2010.

  • API

    Choose Maryland: Compare Counties - Demographics

    opendata.maryland.gov | Last Updated 2019-12-13T12:53:02.000Z

    Population profile - total, rate of change, age, and density.

  • API

    Deer Tick Surveillance: Nymphs (May to Sept) excluding Powassan virus: Beginning 2008

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2021-05-21T14:02:02.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing nymph deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name <i>Ixodes scapularis</i>. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from May to September, when nymph deer ticks are most commonly seen. Nymph deer ticks are individually tested for different bacteria and parasites, which includes the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide nymph tick infections at a precise location and at one point in time. Both measures, tick population density and percentage, of ticks infected with the specified bacteria or parasite can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

  • API

    Maryland Resident Population Per Square Mile: 2010-2019

    opendata.maryland.gov | Last Updated 2020-09-02T21:55:43.000Z

    Resident population density for Maryland and Jurisdictions per square mile from 2010 to 2019. Source: U.S. Bureau of Census

  • API

    Deer Tick Surveillance: Adults (Oct to Dec) Powassan Virus Only: Beginning 2009

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2021-05-21T14:02:00.000Z

    This dataset provides the results from collecting and testing adult deer ticks, also known as blacklegged ticks, or by their scientific name Ixodes scapularis. Collection and testing take place across New York State (excluding New York City) from October to December, when adult deer ticks are most commonly seen. Adult deer ticks are tested in “pools”, or groups of up to ten adult ticks per pool, for the Powassan virus, also known as Deer tick virus. These data should simply be used to educate people that there is a risk of coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases. These data only provide adult tick minimum infection rates at a precise location and at a point in time. Both measures, tick population density and minimum infection percentages, can vary greatly within a very small area and within a county. These data should not be used to broadly predict disease risk for a county. Further below on this page you can find links to tick prevention tips, a video on how to safely remove a tick, and more datasets with tick testing results. Interactive charts and maps provide an easier way to view the data.

  • API

    COVID-19 case rate per 100,000 population and percent test positivity in the last 14 days by town

    data.ct.gov | Last Updated 2021-09-23T20:17:33.000Z

    This dataset includes a count and rate per 100,000 population for COVID-19 cases, a count of COVID-19 molecular diagnostic tests, and a percent positivity rate for tests among people living in community settings for the previous two-week period. Dates are based on date of specimen collection (cases and positivity). A person is considered a new case only upon their first COVID-19 testing result because a case is defined as an instance or bout of illness. If they are tested again subsequently and are still positive, it still counts toward the test positivity metric but they are not considered another case. Percent positivity is calculated as the number of positive tests among community residents conducted during the 14 days divided by the total number of positive and negative tests among community residents during the same period. If someone was tested more than once during that 14 day period, then those multiple test results (regardless of whether they were positive or negative) are included in the calculation. These case and test counts do not include cases or tests among people residing in congregate settings, such as nursing homes, assisted living facilities, or correctional facilities. These data are updated weekly and reflect the previous two full Sunday-Saturday (MMWR) weeks (https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/document/MMWR_week_overview.pdf). DPH note about change from 7-day to 14-day metrics: Prior to 10/15/2020, these metrics were calculated using a 7-day average rather than a 14-day average. The 7-day metrics are no longer being updated as of 10/15/2020 but the archived dataset can be accessed here: https://data.ct.gov/Health-and-Human-Services/COVID-19-case-rate-per-100-000-population-and-perc/s22x-83rd As you know, we are learning more about COVID-19 all the time, including the best ways to measure COVID-19 activity in our communities. CT DPH has decided to shift to 14-day rates because these are more stable, particularly at the town level, as compared to 7-day rates. In addition, since the school indicators were initially published by DPH last summer, CDC has recommended 14-day rates and other states (e.g., Massachusetts) have started to implement 14-day metrics for monitoring COVID transmission as well. With respect to geography, we also have learned that many people are looking at the town-level data to inform decision making, despite emphasis on the county-level metrics in the published addenda. This is understandable as there has been variation within counties in COVID-19 activity (for example, rates that are higher in one town than in most other towns in the county). Additional notes: As of 11/5/2020, CT DPH has added antigen testing for SARS-CoV-2 to reported test counts in this dataset. The tests included in this dataset include both molecular and antigen datasets. Molecular tests reported include polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleic acid amplicfication (NAAT) tests. The population data used to calculate rates is based on the CT DPH population statistics for 2019, which is available online here: https://portal.ct.gov/DPH/Health-Information-Systems--Reporting/Population/Population-Statistics. Prior to 5/10/2021, the population estimates from 2018 were used. Data suppression is applied when the rate is <5 cases per 100,000 or if there are <5 cases within the town. Information on why data suppression rules are applied can be found online here: https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/uscs/technical_notes/stat_methods/suppression.htm

  • API

    COVID-19 case rate per 100,000 population and percent test positivity in the last 7 days by town - ARCHIVE

    data.ct.gov | Last Updated 2021-03-24T14:37:10.000Z

    DPH note about change from 7-day to 14-day metrics: As of 10/15/2020, this dataset is no longer being updated. Starting on 10/15/2020, these metrics will be calculated using a 14-day average rather than a 7-day average. The new dataset using 14-day averages can be accessed here: https://data.ct.gov/Health-and-Human-Services/COVID-19-case-rate-per-100-000-population-and-perc/hree-nys2 As you know, we are learning more about COVID-19 all the time, including the best ways to measure COVID-19 activity in our communities. CT DPH has decided to shift to 14-day rates because these are more stable, particularly at the town level, as compared to 7-day rates. In addition, since the school indicators were initially published by DPH last summer, CDC has recommended 14-day rates and other states (e.g., Massachusetts) have started to implement 14-day metrics for monitoring COVID transmission as well. With respect to geography, we also have learned that many people are looking at the town-level data to inform decision making, despite emphasis on the county-level metrics in the published addenda. This is understandable as there has been variation within counties in COVID-19 activity (for example, rates that are higher in one town than in most other towns in the county). This dataset includes a weekly count and weekly rate per 100,000 population for COVID-19 cases, a weekly count of COVID-19 PCR diagnostic tests, and a weekly percent positivity rate for tests among people living in community settings. Dates are based on date of specimen collection (cases and positivity). A person is considered a new case only upon their first COVID-19 testing result because a case is defined as an instance or bout of illness. If they are tested again subsequently and are still positive, it still counts toward the test positivity metric but they are not considered another case. These case and test counts do not include cases or tests among people residing in congregate settings, such as nursing homes, assisted living facilities, or correctional facilities. These data are updated weekly; the previous week period for each dataset is the previous Sunday-Saturday, known as an MMWR week (https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/document/MMWR_week_overview.pdf). The date listed is the date the dataset was last updated and corresponds to a reporting period of the previous MMWR week. For instance, the data for 8/20/2020 corresponds to a reporting period of 8/9/2020-8/15/2020. Notes: 9/25/2020: Data for Mansfield and Middletown for the week of Sept 13-19 were unavailable at the time of reporting due to delays in lab reporting.