The population count of Westmoreland County, PA was 356,835 in 2017. The population count of Kanawha County, WV was 187,827 in 2017.

Population

Population Change

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Demographics and Population Datasets Involving Westmoreland County, PA or Kanawha County, WV

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    FIPS Codes for PA Counties

    data.pa.gov | Last Updated 2019-02-15T15:53:05.000Z

    This is a listing of Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) codes for each of the 67 counties in Pennsylvania. Information gathered from census data - https://www.census.gov/geo/reference/codes/cou.html For more technical details : Federal Information Processing Standards Publications (FIPS PUBS) are issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) after approval by the Secretary of Commerce pursuant to Section 111 (d) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 as amended by the Computer Security Act of 1987, Public Law 100-235. Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 6-4, Counties and Equivalent Entities of the U.S., Its Possessions, and Associated Areas -- 90 Aug 31 , provides the names and codes that represent the counties and other entities treated as equivalent legal and/or statistical subdivisions of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the possessions and freely associated areas of the United States. Counties are considered to be the "first-order subdivisions" of each State and statistically equivalent entity, regardless of their local designations (county, parish, borough, etc.).

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    Bronx Zip Population and Density

    bronx.lehman.cuny.edu | Last Updated 2012-10-21T14:06:17.000Z

    2010 Census Data on population, pop density, age and ethnicity per zip code

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    Vital Statistics Deaths by Resident County, Region, and Race/Ethnicity: Beginning 2003

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2018-09-06T18:30:44.000Z

    This dataset contains death counts by resident county and race/ethnicity. For more information check out: http://www.health.ny.gov/statistics/vital_statistics.

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    Agriculture Production Data in Pennsylvania 1850 census PA Historical and Museum Commission

    data.pa.gov | Last Updated 2017-10-11T14:05:07.000Z

    Agriculture has guided Pennsylvania's economic growth and cultural development and has profoundly shaped the lands and people of the Commonwealth. The 1850 Federal Decennial Census was the first time in history that data was collected on agricultural production at a national scale. The census manuscripts for Pennsylvania were digitized by PHMC from the original documents in the collections of the National Archives and Records Administration. This dataset includes agricultural production data compiled from Schedule 4 - Productions of Agriculture of the 1850 census and aggregated at the county and municipality level. The visualization combines a timeless practice with the latest advancements in technology. The interactive map of Pennsylvania depicting the value of farms and amounts of livestock provides users with a glimpse into agricultural life in 1850.

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    NCHS - Drug Poisoning Mortality by County: United States

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2017-08-28T15:09:46.000Z

    This dataset describes drug poisoning deaths at the county level by selected demographic characteristics and includes age-adjusted death rates for drug poisoning from 1999 to 2015. Deaths are classified using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD–10). Drug-poisoning deaths are defined as having ICD–10 underlying cause-of-death codes X40–X44 (unintentional), X60–X64 (suicide), X85 (homicide), or Y10–Y14 (undetermined intent). Estimates are based on the National Vital Statistics System multiple cause-of-death mortality files (1). Age-adjusted death rates (deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population for 2000) are calculated using the direct method. Populations used for computing death rates for 2011–2015 are postcensal estimates based on the 2010 U.S. census. Rates for census years are based on populations enumerated in the corresponding censuses. Rates for noncensus years before 2010 are revised using updated intercensal population estimates and may differ from rates previously published. Estimate does not meet standards of reliability or precision. Death rates are flagged as “Unreliable” in the chart when the rate is calculated with a numerator of 20 or less. Death rates for some states and years may be low due to a high number of unresolved pending cases or misclassification of ICD–10 codes for unintentional poisoning as R99, “Other ill-defined and unspecified causes of mortality” (2). For example, this issue is known to affect New Jersey in 2009 and West Virginia in 2005 and 2009 but also may affect other years and other states. Estimates should be interpreted with caution. Smoothed county age-adjusted death rates (deaths per 100,000 population) were obtained according to methods described elsewhere (3–5). Briefly, two-stage hierarchical models were used to generate empirical Bayes estimates of county age-adjusted death rates due to drug poisoning for each year during 1999–2015. These annual county-level estimates “borrow strength” across counties to generate stable estimates of death rates where data are sparse due to small population size (3,5). Estimates are unavailable for Broomfield County, Colo., and Denali County, Alaska, before 2003 (6,7). Additionally, Bedford City, Virginia was added to Bedford County in 2015 and no longer appears in the mortality file in 2015. County boundaries are consistent with the vintage 2005-2007 bridged-race population file geographies (6).

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    New York State Population Data: Beginning 2003

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2018-10-26T17:36:29.000Z

    Population data file is provided as an additional reference file when interpreting vital statistics death rates. The population data is derived from the corresponding release of the NCHS annual estimates of "Bridged Race Vintage" which are consistent with the Bureau of the Census estimates from "Vintage" (released in the summer). For more information, check out: http://www.health.ny.gov/statistics/vital_statistics/. The "About" tab contains additional details concerning this dataset.

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    Vital Statistics Suicide Deaths by Age-Group, Race/Ethnicity, Resident County, Region and Gender: Beginning 2003

    health.data.ny.gov | Last Updated 2018-09-06T18:38:44.000Z

    This dataset contains suicide death counts by region, race or ethnicity, sex, and age group. For more information, check out: http://www.health.ny.gov/statistics/vital_statistics/.

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    State Correction Population June 2015 - Current, Corrections

    data.pa.gov | Last Updated 2019-04-16T21:23:03.000Z

    One of the governor’s goals related to public safety is the Department of Corrections will reduce its state correction population by 5% by 2020. DOC overall total population directly drives the Department’s budget. The baseline for the goal is the total population on June 30, 2015. On June 30, 2015, the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections overall population was 50,366. This dataset contains the total number of state corrections population in the Department’s custody at the end of each month, including those in prison, in contracted county jails, in community phases of the State Intermediate Punishment (SIP) program, in Parole Violator Centers (PVCs), and on temporary transfer to other jurisdictions. DOC publishes a Monthly Population Report to the DOC Website (www.cor.pa.gov). The information published to the website includes the data set and breakdown of populations in each institution.

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    NCHS - Drug Poisoning Mortality by County: United States

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2018-06-04T12:49:09.000Z

    This dataset contains model-based county estimates for drug-poisoning mortality. Deaths are classified using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD–10). Drug-poisoning deaths are defined as having ICD–10 underlying cause-of-death codes X40–X44 (unintentional), X60–X64 (suicide), X85 (homicide), or Y10–Y14 (undetermined intent). Estimates are based on the National Vital Statistics System multiple cause-of-death mortality files (1). Age-adjusted death rates (deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population for 2000) are calculated using the direct method. Populations used for computing death rates for 2011–2016 are postcensal estimates based on the 2010 U.S. census. Rates for census years are based on populations enumerated in the corresponding censuses. Rates for noncensus years before 2010 are revised using updated intercensal population estimates and may differ from rates previously published. Death rates for some states and years may be low due to a high number of unresolved pending cases or misclassification of ICD–10 codes for unintentional poisoning as R99, “Other ill-defined and unspecified causes of mortality” (2). For example, this issue is known to affect New Jersey in 2009 and West Virginia in 2005 and 2009 but also may affect other years and other states. Drug poisoning death rates may be underestimated in those instances. Smoothed county age-adjusted death rates (deaths per 100,000 population) were obtained according to methods described elsewhere (3–5). Briefly, two-stage hierarchical models were used to generate empirical Bayes estimates of county age-adjusted death rates due to drug poisoning for each year. These annual county-level estimates “borrow strength” across counties to generate stable estimates of death rates where data are sparse due to small population size (3,5). Estimates for 1999-2015 have been updated, and may differ slightly from previously published estimates. Differences are expected to be minimal, and may result from different county boundaries used in this release (see below) and from the inclusion of an additional year of data. Previously published estimates can be found here for comparison.(6) Estimates are unavailable for Broomfield County, Colorado, and Denali County, Alaska, before 2003 (7,8). Additionally, Clifton Forge County, Virginia only appears on the mortality files prior to 2003, while Bedford City, Virginia was added to Bedford County in 2015 and no longer appears in the mortality file in 2015. These counties were therefore merged with adjacent counties where necessary to create a consistent set of geographic units across the time period. County boundaries are largely consistent with the vintage 2005-2007 bridged-race population file geographies, with the modifications noted previously (7,8). REFERENCES 1. National Center for Health Statistics. National Vital Statistics System: Mortality data. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm. 2. CDC. CDC Wonder: Underlying cause of death 1999–2016. Available from: http://wonder.cdc.gov/wonder/help/ucd.html. 3. Rossen LM, Khan D, Warner M. Trends and geographic patterns in drug-poisoning death rates in the U.S., 1999–2009. Am J Prev Med 45(6):e19–25. 2013. 4. Rossen LM, Khan D, Warner M. Hot spots in mortality from drug poisoning in the United States, 2007–2009. Health Place 26:14–20. 2014. 5. Rossen LM, Khan D, Hamilton B, Warner M. Spatiotemporal variation in selected health outcomes from the National Vital Statistics System. Presented at: 2015 National Conference on Health Statistics, August 25, 2015, Bethesda, MD. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/ppt/nchs2015/Rossen_Tuesday_WhiteOak_BB3.pdf. 6. Rossen LM, Bastian B, Warner M, and Khan D. NCHS – Drug Poisoning Mortality by County: United States, 1999-2015. Available from: https://data.cdc.gov/NCHS/NCHS-Drug-Poisoning-Mortality-by-County-United-Sta/pbkm-d27e. 7. National Center for Health Statistics. County geog

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    Uninsured Population Census Data CY 2009-2014 Human Services

    data.pa.gov | Last Updated 2019-04-01T15:15:07.000Z

    This data is pulled from the U.S. Census website. This data is for years Calendar Years 2009-2014. Product: SAHIE File Layout Overview Small Area Health Insurance Estimates Program - SAHIE Filenames: SAHIE Text and SAHIE CSV files 2009 – 2014 Source: Small Area Health Insurance Estimates Program, U.S. Census Bureau. Internet Release Date: May 2016 Description: Model‐based Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) for Counties and States File Layout and Definitions The Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) program was created to develop model-based estimates of health insurance coverage for counties and states. This program builds on the work of the Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) program. SAHIE is only source of single-year health insurance coverage estimates for all U.S. counties. For 2008-2014, SAHIE publishes STATE and COUNTY estimates of population with and without health insurance coverage, along with measures of uncertainty, for the full cross-classification of: •5 age categories: 0-64, 18-64, 21-64, 40-64, and 50-64 •3 sex categories: both sexes, male, and female •6 income categories: all incomes, as well as income-to-poverty ratio (IPR) categories 0-138%, 0-200%, 0-250%, 0-400%, and 138-400% of the poverty threshold •4 races/ethnicities (for states only): all races/ethnicities, White not Hispanic, Black not Hispanic, and Hispanic (any race). In addition, estimates for age category 0-18 by the income categories listed above are published. Each year’s estimates are adjusted so that, before rounding, the county estimates sum to their respective state totals and for key demographics the state estimates sum to the national ACS numbers insured and uninsured. This program is partially funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC), National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection ProgramLink to a non-federal Web site (NBCCEDP). The CDC have a congressional mandate to provide screening services for breast and cervical cancer to low-income, uninsured, and underserved women through the NBCCEDP. Most state NBCCEDP programs define low-income as 200 or 250 percent of the poverty threshold. Also included are IPR categories relevant to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In 2014, the ACA will help families gain access to health care by allowing Medicaid to cover families with incomes less than or equal to 138 percent of the poverty line. Families with incomes above the level needed to qualify for Medicaid, but less than or equal to 400 percent of the poverty line can receive tax credits that will help them pay for health coverage in the new health insurance exchanges. We welcome your feedback as we continue to research and improve our estimation methods. The SAHIE program's age model methodology and estimates have undergone internal U.S. Census Bureau review as well as external review. See the SAHIE Methodological Review page for more details and a summary of the comments and our response. The SAHIE program models health insurance coverage by combining survey data from several sources, including: •The American Community Survey (ACS) •Demographic population estimates •Aggregated federal tax returns •Participation records for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp program •County Business Patterns •Medicaid •Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) participation records •Census 2010 Margin of error (MOE). Some ACS products provide an MOE instead of confidence intervals. An MOE is the difference between an estimate and its upper or lower confidence bounds. Confidence bounds can be created by adding the margin of error to the estimate (for the upper bound) and subtracting the margin of error from the estimate (for the lower bound). All published ACS margins of error are based on a 90-percent confidence level.