The median environmental health hazard index of Fairfax County, VA was 33 in 2015.

Median Environmental Health Hazard Index

The environmental health hazard exposure index summarizes potential exposure to harmful toxins including carcinogenic, respiratory, and neurological hazards. Values are percentile ranked and range from 0 to 100, with higher values corresponding to less exposure to harmful toxins. Data is computed for U.S. counties by applying summary statistics across all census tracts present in a county and is current as of 2015.

Above charts are based on data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development | Data Source | ODN Dataset | API - Notes:

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Health and Environmental Health Datasets Involving Fairfax County, VA

  • API

    NCHS - Drug Poisoning Mortality by County: United States

    data.cdc.gov | Last Updated 2018-06-04T12:49:09.000Z

    This dataset contains model-based county estimates for drug-poisoning mortality. Deaths are classified using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD–10). Drug-poisoning deaths are defined as having ICD–10 underlying cause-of-death codes X40–X44 (unintentional), X60–X64 (suicide), X85 (homicide), or Y10–Y14 (undetermined intent). Estimates are based on the National Vital Statistics System multiple cause-of-death mortality files (1). Age-adjusted death rates (deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population for 2000) are calculated using the direct method. Populations used for computing death rates for 2011–2016 are postcensal estimates based on the 2010 U.S. census. Rates for census years are based on populations enumerated in the corresponding censuses. Rates for noncensus years before 2010 are revised using updated intercensal population estimates and may differ from rates previously published. Death rates for some states and years may be low due to a high number of unresolved pending cases or misclassification of ICD–10 codes for unintentional poisoning as R99, “Other ill-defined and unspecified causes of mortality” (2). For example, this issue is known to affect New Jersey in 2009 and West Virginia in 2005 and 2009 but also may affect other years and other states. Drug poisoning death rates may be underestimated in those instances. Smoothed county age-adjusted death rates (deaths per 100,000 population) were obtained according to methods described elsewhere (3–5). Briefly, two-stage hierarchical models were used to generate empirical Bayes estimates of county age-adjusted death rates due to drug poisoning for each year. These annual county-level estimates “borrow strength” across counties to generate stable estimates of death rates where data are sparse due to small population size (3,5). Estimates for 1999-2015 have been updated, and may differ slightly from previously published estimates. Differences are expected to be minimal, and may result from different county boundaries used in this release (see below) and from the inclusion of an additional year of data. Previously published estimates can be found here for comparison.(6) Estimates are unavailable for Broomfield County, Colorado, and Denali County, Alaska, before 2003 (7,8). Additionally, Clifton Forge County, Virginia only appears on the mortality files prior to 2003, while Bedford City, Virginia was added to Bedford County in 2015 and no longer appears in the mortality file in 2015. These counties were therefore merged with adjacent counties where necessary to create a consistent set of geographic units across the time period. County boundaries are largely consistent with the vintage 2005-2007 bridged-race population file geographies, with the modifications noted previously (7,8). REFERENCES 1. National Center for Health Statistics. National Vital Statistics System: Mortality data. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm. 2. CDC. CDC Wonder: Underlying cause of death 1999–2016. Available from: http://wonder.cdc.gov/wonder/help/ucd.html. 3. Rossen LM, Khan D, Warner M. Trends and geographic patterns in drug-poisoning death rates in the U.S., 1999–2009. Am J Prev Med 45(6):e19–25. 2013. 4. Rossen LM, Khan D, Warner M. Hot spots in mortality from drug poisoning in the United States, 2007–2009. Health Place 26:14–20. 2014. 5. Rossen LM, Khan D, Hamilton B, Warner M. Spatiotemporal variation in selected health outcomes from the National Vital Statistics System. Presented at: 2015 National Conference on Health Statistics, August 25, 2015, Bethesda, MD. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/ppt/nchs2015/Rossen_Tuesday_WhiteOak_BB3.pdf. 6. Rossen LM, Bastian B, Warner M, and Khan D. NCHS – Drug Poisoning Mortality by County: United States, 1999-2015. Available from: https://data.cdc.gov/NCHS/NCHS-Drug-Poisoning-Mortality-by-County-United-Sta/pbkm-d27e. 7. National Center for Health Statistics. County geog

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    County Budgeted Expenditures By Service Area By Fiscal Year

    data.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2018-10-01T19:49:05.000Z

    This dataset provides budgeted expenditures for the counties within the State of Iowa beginning with FY 2005 (fiscal year ending 6/30/2005).

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    Iowa Child Welfare Assessments by Disposition, County and Year

    data.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2018-04-23T18:58:17.000Z

    This dataset provides the number and disposition of child welfare assessments conducted by the Department of Human Services beginning January 1, 2004. On January 1, 2014, the department began using the Differential Response System, which allows for a family assessment in additional to a traditional child abuse investigation for allegations of abuse and neglect. Data prior to 2014 only report child abuse investigations. The family assessment is not used in physical or sexual abuse cases, or other types of serious abuse cases seen. It is used only in denial of critical care cases where the child is not in imminent danger. If at any time during a family assessment it appears the child isn’t safe, the case is reassigned to the child abuse assessment pathway. The family assessment pathway results in pairing families with services and supports. The traditional child abuse assessments result in a finding. Findings include: “founded” meaning abuse occurred and results in perpetrator placement on the child abuse registry; “confirmed” meaning abuse occurred, but it was minor, isolated and not likely to reoccur, does not go on the central abuse registry; and “unconfirmed” meaning abuse did not occur.

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    Iowa Veterans Home Current and Past Residents

    data.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2018-03-28T14:42:12.000Z

    The Iowa Veterans Home provides a continuum of care to Iowa’s veterans and their spouses in an environment focusing on individualized services to enhance their quality of life. The Iowa Veterans Home opened its doors to Iowa veterans and their spouses in 1887. This dataset provides information on its residents.

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    DWR Dam Safety Jurisdictional Dam

    data.colorado.gov | Last Updated 2018-12-11T07:46:15.000Z

    A Jurisdictional Dam is a dam creating a reservoir with a capacity of more than 100 acre-feet, or creates a reservoir with a surface area in excess of 20 acres at the high-water line, or exceeds 10 feet in height measured vertically from the elevation of the lowest point of the natural surface of the ground where that point occurs along the longitudinal centerline of the dam up to the crest of the emergency spillway of the dam. For reservoirs created by excavation, or where the invert of the outlet conduit is placed below the surface of the natural ground at its lowest point beneath the dam, the jurisdictional height shall be measured from the invert of the outlet at the longitudinal centerline of the embankment or from the bottom of the excavation at the longitudinal centerline of the dam, whichever is greatest. Jurisdictional height is defined in Rule 4.2.19. The State Engineer shall have final authority over determination of the jurisdictional height of the dam.

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    Iowa Assessed Property Values By Tax District and Year

    data.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2018-08-24T19:04:14.000Z

    This dataset contains 100% assessed property values for classes of real property in Iowa beginning with assessment year 2000. Real property is mostly land, buildings, structures, and other improvements that are constructed on or in the land, attached to the land, or placed upon a foundation. Typical improvements include a building, house or mobile home, fences, and paving. Classes of real property include the following: Residential, Agricultural Land, Agricultural Buildings, Commercial, Industrial, Utilities, and Railroads. The assessed property values help determine the net taxable valuations for property tax levies (e.g. 2012 assessment property values help determine the net taxable valuations for FY 2014 property tax levies).

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    Taxable Property Values in Iowa by Tax District and Year

    data.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2018-03-28T17:53:40.000Z

    This dataset contains taxable property values for classes of real property in Iowa by tax district. Taxable values are based on assessed valuations after application of the statutory assessment limitation (i.e. rollback), and is the value to which tax rates are applied (e.g. 2012 net taxable valuations are used for the FY 2014 property tax levies). Real property is mostly land, buildings, structures, and other improvements that are constructed on or in the land, attached to the land, or placed upon a foundation. Typical improvements include a building, house or mobile home, fences, and paving. Classes of real property include the following: Residential, Agricultural Land, Agricultural Buildings, Commercial, Industrial, Utilities and Railroads.

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    Advanced Messaging Concept Development: Probe Vehicle Data

    data.transportation.gov | Last Updated 2018-11-09T20:15:34.000Z

    Contains all PVDs generated during the AMCD field testing program. The probe vehicle message is used to exchange status about a vehicle with other DSRC readers to allow the collection of information about a typical vehicle’s traveling behaviors along a segment of road. The exchanges of this message as well as the event which caused the collection of various elements defined in the messages are in Annex B of the SAE J2735 standard.

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    Advanced Messaging Concept Development: Basic Mobility Message

    data.transportation.gov | Last Updated 2018-11-09T20:27:04.000Z

    Contains all Basic Mobility Messages (BMMs) collected during the Advanced Messaging Concept Development (AMCD) field testing program. While there is no specific standard in existence that addresses the content of a BMM, the descriptive definitions of the variables were derived from the J2735 standard where applicable. All BSMs are generated by OBUs and ultimately received by the VCC Cloud server.

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    County Actual Expenditures by Service Area by Fiscal Year

    data.iowa.gov | Last Updated 2018-10-01T21:12:23.000Z

    This dataset provides actual county expenditure data for every county in the State of Iowa beginning in Fiscal Year 2010 (year ending June 30, 2010).